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Descubre Mojácar

Restaurante
“Arlequino es un restaurante en el pueblo con una bonita decoración rústica y que tiene muy buen puntaje en internet.”
  • Recomendado por 3 personas locales
Lodging
“Just around the corner for panoramic views over the Mediterranean sea & the valley.”
  • Recomendado por 3 personas locales
Locality
“Mojácar Pueblo is a beautiful historic centre, a picturesque jumble of white-cube houses daubed down an inland hilltop. Great for an evening of wandering, shopping and dining. ”
  • Recomendado por 40 personas locales
Night Club
“This is the late-night hang in the village. It’s a drinking spot, no food. Ending up in here is a right of passage.”
  • Recomendado por 3 personas locales
Locality
“THE HISTORY OF MOJACAR Mojácar has been populated since the Bronze Age, around 2000 BC, but it was under Moorish rule in the 800s AD when Mojácar really flourished. During the 14th century, there were fierce battles between Christians and Moors as they fought over Andalucia. An important date in the history of Mojácar Pueblo is 10th June 1488, when the Moorish leaders of the region agreed to cede rule to the forces of the Catholic kings. However, the governor of Mojácar refused to join, as he believed that his town was already Spanish. Instead, a delegation sent by the Spanish king came to Mojácar and met with the governor. The governor told the delegation: “I am as Spanish as you. After my people have lived in Spain for more than seven hundred years, you tell us to go. I have never borne arms against the Christians. I therefore believe it is fair that you treat us like brothers, not like enemies, and that you allow us to continue working our land.” So, a pact was agreed which allowed a free association between local Moors, Christians and Jews. This landmark event is commemorated with a plaque at Mojácar’s Moorish fountain, and every year the town celebrates with a huge Moors and Christians Festival, where the whole town dresses in traditional Moorish or Christian clothes, there are parades and music and celebration of the diversity in Mojácar. Mojácar’s good fortunes began to change around the middle of the 19th century when several severe droughts led to mass emigration to northern Spain, other parts of Europe and to South America. The town fell into disrepair as people could no longer afford to maintain them properly. Finally, in the 1960s, the arrival of tourists to the region began to bring money and life back to Mojácar. Mojácar Pueblo Today Today, Mojácar Pueblo is a beautiful town. The people of Mojácar clearly take great pride in the appearance and culture of the town. Every building is painted white, in keeping with the traditional Moorish style of the region, and colourful doors and flower pots create a picturesque setting. Don’t miss the old entrance to the town (below), the archway was once the gateway in the walls which protected the town. Santa Maria Church was also used as a fortress, so from the outside, it is definitely more functional than beautiful. However, take a peek inside and check out the unusual painting of Christ. He is painted looking peaceful and serene, holding a rainbow in his hands, just like the symbol of Mojácar, the Indalo. In the square outside the church, you’ll find a statue of a Mojaquera (a woman from Mojácar) dressed in traditional Moorish clothes, carrying a water jug on her head. Rumour has it, if you touch her breasts you will fall in love with Mojácar and will come back to the town. The Mirador del Castillo has one of the best views in town, where you can see all the way to the sea (which isn’t really that far away!). Plaza Nueva is a meeting point for locals and tourists in Mojácar, and the views across Almeria Province are stunning, especially at sunset. Although Mojácar seems peacefully quiet most of the time, if you happen to visit when there is a festival the town really comes to life. We were there for the “Noche de las Velas” candlelight festival when the town switches off the electricity and thousands of candles light up the night. The streets of Mojácar are even prettier by candlelight, although there are hundreds of visitors too! ”
  • Recomendado por 32 personas locales
Point of Interest
“Views over the whole area, to Turre, Los Gallardos and Bedar in one direction and over Garrucha to Palomares and Vicoricos in the other.”
  • Recomendado por 1 persona local
Establishment
  • Recomendado por 2 personas locales
Tabaquería
“Lots of lovely little shops to browse in, bars, restaurants and stunning views.”
  • Recomendado por 1 persona local
Iglesia
“Construida a finales del s.XVI, probablemente sobre una antigua mezquita árabe. Este edificio fue utilizado como lugar de culto, pero también como fortaleza. En su interior se puede encontrar una pintura del pintor alemán Michael Sucker, que vivió durante 9 años en Mojácar.”
  • Recomendado por 1 persona local
Gastrobar
$$$
“A bit more sophisticated than the others & a bit more expensive but worth it for the excellent service & food.”
  • Recomendado por 1 persona local
Restaurante
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“This place is run by Craig. He’s English but he grew up here. He knows everything about the town. The food here is excellent. Try the ox ribs if you’re super hungry.”
  • Recomendado por 2 personas locales
Restaurante italiano
$
“Comida rica, bien de precio y con unas vistas preciosas y muy diferentes de Mojacar Pueblo, un sitio tranquilo e incluso romántico si lo deseas. Rich food, well priced and with beautiful and very different views of Mojacar Pueblo, a quiet and even romantic place if you wish.”
  • Recomendado por 2 personas locales
Restaurante italiano
$$
  • Recomendado por 1 persona local
Bar
“Great authentic tapas place, super cheap and lots of vegetarian options. Open late. Try the vermouth and the chicken livers.”
  • Recomendado por 1 persona local
Point of Interest
“Located at the edge of Mojacar Pueblo, this is a public drinking water source, where people come daily to fill their 5 litre bottles with shining clear drinking water. It is a courtyard covered with bright Andalucian wall tiles, and potted geraniums hanging on the walls. The spring which feeds the taps has been active for hundreds of years since the time of the Moorish occupation. In the late 1800s the spring was enclosed, tidied and made easily accessible to the people of the pueblo.”
  • Recomendado por 2 personas locales